MAN IN THE MIRROR PDF

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Michael Jackson Man in the Mirror. Uploaded by yirumi. Copyright: Attribution Non-Commercial (BY-NC). Download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd. MICHAEl jACksON — Man in the Mirror is one of the most played tributes to the late King of At odds with its success as an upbeat pop song, Man in the Mirror. Recorded by Michael Jackson. Man in the Mirror. Words and Music by. Glen Ballard and Siedah Garrett. Arranged by Ed Lojeski. Available for SATB and SAB.


Man In The Mirror Pdf

Author:ISAURA HAROLDSEN
Language:English, French, Portuguese
Country:Slovenia
Genre:Business & Career
Pages:445
Published (Last):07.12.2015
ISBN:649-6-20242-409-1
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PDF File Size:19.26 MB
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INTRO. 1x:PIanointro. D.C: Nananananana. Man in The mirror Vers. 1&2. 1- Vers 3x: Trommer og Gitar inn. 1: Vers repeter. 2:vers Vers repeter. 4x. 2x. 'cause they got no- where to go. That's why I want you to know. 4. 4. &. #. ∑. Man In The Mirror. Michael Jackson. (Arr Jamie Serafi). ('Joyful Noise' Version). Print and download in PDF or MIDI Man in the Mirror. This is a modified version of an arrangement by Ed Lojeski of the hit song performed by Michael Jackson.

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Man In The Mirror: Michael Jackson Story

When I asked him about the vision for the company, the CEO sheepishly realized that he had never actually written down a vision statement. He decided to organize an off-site meeting for his senior management team to discuss and specifically articulate a vision for the company. After a vigorous debate, the group quickly agreed on a vision and strategic priorities.

They realized that in order to achieve their shared goals, the business would in fact require substantial financing sooner rather than later—or they would need to scale back some of the initiatives that were central to their vision for the company.

Once they fully appreciated this trade-off, they understood what the CEO was trying to accomplish and left the meeting united about their financing strategy. The CEO was quite surprised at how easy it had been to bring the members of his leadership team together.

Because they agreed on where they were going as a company, specific issues were much easier to resolve. A common pitfall in articulating a vision is a failure to boil it down to a manageable list of initiatives. Culling the list involves thinking through and then making difficult choices and trade-off decisions.

These choices communicate volumes to your people about how they should be spending their time. I spoke with the manager of a national sales force who felt frustrated that his direct reports were not focusing on the tasks necessary to achieve their respective regional sales goals.

As a result, sales were growing at a slower rate than budgeted at the beginning of the year. When I asked him to enumerate the three to five key priorities he expected his salespeople to focus on, he paused and then explained that there were 15 and it would be very difficult to narrow the list down to five. Even as he spoke, a light went on in his head. He reflected on this issue for the next two weeks, thinking at length about his own experience as a regional manager and consulting with various colleagues.

He then picked three priorities that he felt were crucial to achieving sales growth. The most important of these involved a major new-business targeting exercise followed by a substantial new-prospect calling effort. The regional managers immediately understood and began focusing on these initiatives.

The fact is that having 15 priorities is the same as having none at all. Managers have a responsibility to translate their vision into a manageable number of priorities that their subordinates can understand and act on. The fact is, having 15 priorities is the same as having none at all. Failing to communicate your vision and priorities has direct costs to you in terms of time and business effectiveness.

This issue can cascade through the organization if your direct reports are, in turn, unable to communicate a vision and effectively leverage their own subordinates.

Managing Time The second area to question is painfully simple and closely relates to the first: How am I spending my time? Most of us go through periods where unexpected events and day-to-day chaos cause us to be reactive rather than acting on a proscribed plan. Crises, surprises, personnel issues, and interruptions make the workweek seem like a blur. I have recommended to many leaders that they track how they spend each hour of each day for one week, then categorize the hours into types of activities: business development, people management, and strategic planning, for example.

For most executives, the results of this exercise are startling—even horrifying—with obvious disconnects between what their top priorities are and how they are spending their time.

For example, the CEO of a midsize manufacturing company was frustrated because he was working 70 hours a week and never seemed to catch up.

His family life suffered, and, at work, he was constantly unavailable for his people and major customers. I suggested he step back and review how he was managing his time hour-by-hour over the course of a week. Sitting in my office, he struggled to explain why he had not delegated some portion of this responsibility; it turned out that the activity was a holdover from a time when the company was much smaller.

He was amazed that he had not recognized this issue and made this simple change much earlier. How you spend your time is an important question not only for you but for your team. The CEO of a rapidly growing, person professional services firm felt that, to build the business, senior managers needed to develop stronger and more substantive relationships with clients. This meant that senior professionals would need to spend significantly more time out of their offices in meetings with clients.

When asked how his own time was being spent, the CEO was unable to answer. After tracking it for a week, he was shocked to find that he was devoting a tremendous amount of his time to administrative activities related to managing the firm. He immediately began pushing himself to delegate a number of these administrative tasks and increase the amount of time he spent on the road with customers, setting a powerful example for his people.

He directed each of his senior managers to do a similar time-allocation exercise to ensure they were dedicating sufficient time to clients.

Of course, the way a leader spends his or her time must be tailored to the needs of the business, which may vary depending on time of year, personnel changes, and external factors.

The Man in the Mirror by Patrick Morley PDF Download

The key here is, whatever you decide, time allocation needs to be a conscious decision that fits your vision and priorities for the business. Just as you would step back and review a major investment decision, you need to dispassionately review the manner in which you invest your time.

Feedback When you think about the ways you approach feedback, you should first ask: Do I give people timely, direct, and constructive feedback? In my experience, well-intentioned managers typically fail to give blunt, direct, and timely feedback to their subordinates. One reason for this failure is that managers are often afraid that constructive feedback and criticism will demoralize their employees. In addition, critiquing a professional in a frank and timely manner may be perceived as overly confrontational.

Lastly, many managers fear that this type of feedback will cause employees not to like them. Consequently, leaders often wait until year-end performance reviews. The year-end review is evaluative that is, the verdict on the year and therefore is not conducive to constructive coaching.

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The subordinate is typically on the defensive and not as open to criticism. This approach creates surprises, often unpleasant ones, which undermine trust and dramatically reduce the confidence of the subordinate in the manager. If employees have fallen short of expectations, the failing is reflected in bonuses, raises, and promotions. The feeling of injustice can be enormous. On the contrary, I would argue that people are more likely to stay if they understand what issues they need to address and they trust you to bring those issues to their attention in a straightforward and prompt fashion.

They may well redouble their efforts to prove to you that they can overcome these issues. During my career at Goldman Sachs, I consistently found that professional development was far more effective when coaching and direct feedback were given to employees throughout the year—well in advance of the annual performance review process.

Internal surveys of managing directors showed that, in cases where feedback was confined to the year-end review, satisfaction with career development was dramatically lower than when it was offered throughout the year. As hard as it is to give effective and timely feedback, many leaders find it much more challenging to get feedback from their employees.

They see you in your day-to-day activities, and they experience your decisions directly. Your boss, at this stage, is much more removed and, as a result, typically needs to talk to your subordinates to assess your performance at the end of the year. In order to avoid your own year-end surprises, you need to develop a network of junior professionals who are willing to give you constructive feedback.

The problem is that, while your direct reports know what you are doing wrong, most of them are not dying to tell you. While your direct reports know what you are doing wrong, most of them are not dying to tell you. It takes a concerted effort to cultivate subordinates who will advise and coach you.

It also takes patience and some relentlessness. By this time, beads of sweat begin to become visible on their foreheads. What you do with this feedback is critical.

If you act on it, you will improve your performance. Equally important, you will take a big step in building trust and laying the groundwork for a channel of honest feedback. When subordinates see that you respond positively to suggestions, they will often feel more ownership in the business and in your success.

Succession Planning Another question that managers know is important yet struggle to answer affirmatively is: Have I, at least in my own mind, picked one or more potential successors? Being a bottleneck invariably means that you are not spending enough time on vital leadership priorities and are failing to develop your key subordinates.

The Man In The Mirror by Georgia Le Carre

Ironically, when leaders believe they are so talented that they can perform tasks far better than any of their subordinates and therefore insist on doing the tasks themselves, they will typically cause their businesses to underperform, and, ultimately, their careers will suffer as well. The succession question also has significant implications that cascade through an organization: If leaders do not develop successors, then the organization may lack a sufficient number of leaders to successfully grow the business.

Worse, if junior employees are not developed, they may leave the firm for better opportunities elsewhere. For these reasons, many well-managed companies will hesitate to promote executives who have failed to develop successors.Print s. More for guitar solo Regardless of the source of stress, every leader experiences it, so a good question to ask yourself is: How do I behave under pressure, and what signals am I sending my employees?

Does it reflect who I truly am? This issue can cascade through the organization if your direct reports are, in turn, unable to communicate a vision and effectively leverage their own subordinates. Does worry about my next promotion or bonus cause me to pull punches or hesitate to express my views?